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How to Glaze Furniture: My Buffet Sideboard Makeover

A STEP BY STEP GUIDE ON HOW TO GLAZE YOUR FURNITURE

 Hey painters! I'm super excited to share my latest makeover with you all! I stumbled across this beautiful sideboard at a local op shop, it had a few blemishes and I personally found the timber outdated. Nothing a little TLC can't fix right?!.....

 

 

SO WHY GLAZE?

The theme I wanted for this piece is the ultimate French Style. This piece was singing French all over with its carved details, trimmings and sexy feet! The top of this gorgeous sideboard had a thin layer of veneer with stunning herringbone detail that I stained in a gorgeous driftwood colour. I wanted the carved details to stand out with subtle grey tones to compliment the driftwood stained top. The choices that I had in my tinted wax collection were white, black and antique, all of which I felt were not appropriate in terms of matching the stained top. The benefit of using glaze, is that it is clear and can be tinted with whatever colour paint you want. In this instance, I tinted it with "Slate" a deep charcoal grey from the Artisan Natural Chalk Finish Range.  Here is a close up of the gorgeous herringbone detail. Isn't is divine! 

 

EQUIPMENT NEEDED:

  • Paint brushes
  • Fine grit sandpaper
  • Baby wipes
  • Chux Cloths
  • Artisan Natural Chalk Finish "Travertine" and "Slate"
  • Artisan Clear Glaze
  • Artisan Flat Matte Sealer
  • Artisan Clear Wax

Step #1: PAINT 

After a thorough clean and light scuff sand all over, I began with painting this beautiful sideboard in the chosen colour "Travertine" a beautiful antique white. 3 coats covered this dark timber perfectly. Once the paint dried, I gave the whole piece a light sand with 320 grit sandpaper to sand the whole piece smooth before moving to the next step.

Step #2: SEAL WITH FLAT MATTE SEALER

Because Chalk Paint is porous, it is important that I emphasise this next step of sealing. Before Glazing over Chalk Paint, it is crucial you seal your chalk paint with a polyacrylic. Why? This is to ensure that your glaze does not soak into your porous Chalk Paint and stain it. My go to polyacrylic sealer is Artisan Flat Matte Sealer. Just wipe it on and it dries clear and matte, sealing your chalk paint for glazing. For this piece, to avoid wastage, I only sealed over the areas I wanted to glaze, rather than the whole piece so to speak. I applied the Flat Matte Sealer 5cm outside the fields I wish to glaze to allow room for play when I glaze in the next step. Once the polyacrylic is dry, you can proceed to glaze in the next step. Allow 2- 3 hours to dry.

Step #3: GLAZE YOUR HEART OUT

When it comes to glazing, I tint my glaze mixture in a ratio of 1 Part Paint tint to 3 Parts Glaze. After mixing Slate into my clear glaze mixture, I began to apply it using my Staalmeester round head synthetic paint brush. This brush is nice for this because it gets right into the carved detail perfectly.

The benefit of glaze, is that is is a slow drying medium, therefore allowing you time to play around with it before wiping it away. After I painted the glaze on, I immediately wiped those areas down with baby wipes, leaving a build up of glaze in the crevices of the carved details. After each wipe is saturated with glaze, simply throw it away and use a fresh wipe to continue to wipe away excess glaze on the flat areas so its clean and crisp against the build up in the crevices.

Once you are happy with the amount of glaze, allow to dry for approximately 2-3 hours.

STEP #4- SEAL WITH WAX

Once the glaze was completely dry, I sealed the whole piece with clear wax. The stained top, I sealed with 2 coats of Flat Matte Sealer, followed by brown wax to deepen the colour. The whole piece once sealed has incredible depth and looks amazing! I'm really pleased with this piece and it certainly now appears as though it came straight from France!

 

 

Happy Painting!

Meg xx